Sustainability in the Victorianist Classroom

In 1879 Gerard Manley Hopkins returned to a very different Oxford than he remembered from his undergraduate years. The “rural keeping” that he delighted in had been replaced by the “graceless growth” of modern suburbs. Most troubling, he found that his “aspens dear” were “all felled,” leading to his heartbreaking repetition of the strokes in … More Sustainability in the Victorianist Classroom

Happy May the 4th!

Happy Star Wars Day! I think the saga has so much teaching potential, from learning about political theory to the development of myths. Even what we might call the lesser installments have something important to teach us–or they at least reflect us back to ourselves as all pop culture does. For this May the 4th, … More Happy May the 4th!

“Happy the Eye That Saw Our Temple”: Liturgy in Daniel Deronda

One of the most beautiful descriptions of a liturgy I’ve ever read comes from George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda. In this moment, the titular character has his first experience of Jewish worship, having opted for the Spanish-Hebrew liturgy rather than the vernacular. The liturgical moment that Deronda experiences is actually Yom Kippur, but I think the … More “Happy the Eye That Saw Our Temple”: Liturgy in Daniel Deronda

A Literary Kalendar

There is so much overlap between literature and liturgy. Sometimes a liturgy will take central place in a novel, such as the baptism in Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles or the wedding at the end of any marriage plot. Many liturgies themselves are a collection of literary genres, ranging from myth to poetry to exhortation, blended with … More A Literary Kalendar