Top Ten Tuesday: Ten–Well, Seven–Books on My Syllabus

This is an old Top Ten Tuesday suggested by The Broke and the Bookish that I didn’t have a chance to finish, but I think these books are important and wanted to share them with you.  This reading list is for a difference, power, and discrimination class centered around ambilcultural or bicultural novels. Its goal follows Chimamanda Adichie’s reminder that “when we reject the single story, when we realize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise”

Course Description

According to the management scholar, Ming-Jer Chen, being ambicultural is the practice of balancing and integrating aspects of both the East and the West. At the heart of ambiculturalism is the Chinese word, wen, which is the understanding of culture as “a broad notion that encompasses all human affairs.” In this course, we will study novelists whose writing represents a shared space for cultures to meet. Whether focusing on the experience of immigrating to the United States or as a careful crafting of tropes and forms, each of these novels draws on two or more cultures. With these voices we will evaluate the ambicultural mindset and explore how being ambicultural factors into the larger conversation of being bicultural and bilingual and the framework of Postcolonial studies. With a combination of freewriting, class discussions, and group presentations, we will collaboratively explore when we have understood others through a single story and how reading novels can help expand our understanding of persons and places.

The following slides are the major writers and critics we would read in the class in the same order as they show up in the syllabus. The quotes featured in the slide may not necessarily be from the core text, listed at the bottom of each slide, but another work by the author that we would read selections of.

Is it just me, or does Erdrich’s cat seem to be terrified of Murakami’s?

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